Feast your eyes on the epic top photos of 2022 Milky Way Photographer of the Year


“The Rocks” – © Rachel Roberts/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

When you move away from the city’s light pollution, a whole new world is waiting to be photographed. One of the most popular subjects is certainly our galaxy, and as far as I’m concerned, its sight will never cease to amaze me.

So, I was thrilled to learn that the travel photography blog Capture the Atlas ran another competition for the best Milky Way photo of the year. The results have just been published, and it seems that the top images get better and better every year. Dan Zafra of Capture the Atlas shared some of the winning photos with us, so let us feast our eyes together on these fantastic images.

Like every year, the contest doesn’t feature just one winner. There are 25 best photos taken by 25 talented photographers from different parts of the world. This year’s list includes images taken in 12 countries, including the US, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Argentina, Egypt, France, Spain, Slovenia, Slovakia, Japan, and China. As for the criteria for choosing the best shot, there are a few: the quality of the image, the story behind the photo, and the overall inspiration that it can provide.

If you’d like to take your shots (and perhaps submit them for the following year’s contest), Dan shares some helpful information to help you make the best out of your shots. First of all, keep in mind that there’s the “Milky way season.” It ranges from February to October in the Northern Hemisphere and from January to November in the Southern Hemisphere. “The best time to see and photograph the Milky Way is usually between May and June with the maximum hours of visibility of the Milky Way on both hemispheres,” Dan adds.

Other than timing, it’s essential to find a dark place to shoot. You need to get as far away from light pollution as possible, and Dan also suggests visiting areas at higher elevations. In this article, you’ll find lots of helpful information on light pollution and resources that will help you plan your shoot.

And now, for the best part: enjoy this year’s best Milky Way photos and see the full selection on Capture the Atlas.

“Winter sky over the mountains” – © Tomáš Slovinský/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“The salt road” – Alexis Trigo/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“The Rocks” – © Rachel Roberts/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“The Milky Way arching over The Pinnacles Desert” – © Trevor Dobson/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Perseid meteor shower on Mangart saddle” – © Uroš Fink/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Path to the past” – © Jose Manuel Galvan Rangel/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Milky Way arch in the morning hours of spring” – © Egor Goryachev/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Lightning the Milky way” – © Jinyi He/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Ice Age” – © Alvin Wu/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Galactic Kiwi” – © Evan McKay/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Egyptian Nights” – © Burak Esenbey/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Starlit Needle” – © Spencer Welling/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Secret” – © Marcin Zajac/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“Mt. Fuji and the Milky Way over Lake Kawaguchi” – © Takemochi Yuki/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year

“House of Lavender” – © Benjamin Barakat/2022 Milky Way photographer of the year



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